Tag Archives: snow

Curry for Christmas

 

snowy days in Huddersfield

snowy days in Huddersfield

A curry for Christmas, that’s what I’ll be having for Christmas lunch along with a roast chicken, Brussels sprouts, carrots, parsnips, potatoes, gravy and cranberry sauce and if we’re really lucky we might have a turkey instead of the roast chicken! So this is what you call an Asian Christmas. Don’t get me wrong we love Christmas dinner, Christmas decorations and in all, the Christmas spirit (apart from the rush of the shops) so where does the curry fit in? Well, we always have a curry don’t we? In my household not so much, it’s mainly pasta, wraps, rice pizzas, but the older generations still do and if they don’t, on Christmas day you will be guaranteed to have some chilli piled on one of the veggies!! This is what you call the best of both worlds and dual cultural heritage. I can’t wait to get the crackers out and have the kids wake up knowing its Christmas. As Muslims we have had our religious celebrations and the kids were inundated with presents on Eid which still seem to be coming out of the corners of the house, but they still hold onto the idea of Santa Claus and Rudolf, know about the birth of Jesus and participate in Christmas concerts. With two cultures they understand both and are happy having the opportunity to have both, so a curry it will be for Christmas, with all of the trimmings of course…and if we’re really, really lucky we might even get snow!

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Snow up to your knees

Forty years ago not only was society different with regards to culture, ethnicity and social activities, bit climate was also different. For South Asians coming into Britain, one of the shocking things for them was the weather. In the 1960’s summer was summer and winter was winter. In the summer the sun would shine and the beaches would be filled and in the winter the snow would fall and wellies and shovels would come out. On the Asian voices website (www.asianvoices.org.uk) we have many recollections of the snow, going to the outdoor toilet in your wellies, remembering the snow falling and staying on the ground for months at a time and my favourite is the way in which Mohammad Siddique describes the ice in his mother tounge punjabi as looking like “sheets of glass on the rooftops”. The description oral history provides to the past highlights the imporatance to which it must be preserved and if you would like your oral histories recorded, please contact me via the Asian Voices website.